Wednesday, February 9, 2022

MCQs - Class XI - Snapshots - Chapter 7 - Birth - by A.J. Cronin.

Objective type questions.:-
Q.1. Who is the author of "Birth"?
(A) A.J. Cronin
(B) J.B. Priestley
(C) Andrew Manson
(D) Edward Page

Q.2. Andrew did his medical practice under the assistance of____
(A) Dr. Page
(B) Dr. Morgan
(C) Dr. William
(D) Dr. Shane

Q.3. Where did Joe Morgan live?
(A) Number 11, Blaina Terrace
(B) Number 14, Bryngower
(C) Number 12, Blaina Terrace
(D) Number 12, Bryngower

Q.4. When Andrew approached, Susan was accompanied by her mother and 
(A) Joe
(B) father
(C) a midwife
(D) mother-in-law

Q.5. "Don't fret, mother, I'll not run away." Why did Andrew say this?
(A) To reassure Mrs. Morgan's mother
(B) To fulfill his obligations
(C) To break the silence
(D) To handle a critical situation well

Q.6. While waiting at Joe's house, what did Andrew think about?
(A) Mrs. Morgan's condition
(B) Failed marriages
(C) Christine
(D) Both (B) and (C)

Q.7. What dilemma did doctor Andrew confront? 
(A) Whether the child could be saved or not.
(B) Whether the treatment would be successful.
(C) Whether to attend the child or the mother. (D) Whether to inform Joe or not.

Q.8. In the dilemma he faced, what did Andrew (A) Check upon Susan first
(B) Check upon the child first
(C) Ran away
(D) Left it to handle to the midwife

Q.9. Where had the midwife placed the stillborn child?
(A) She held the child in her arms
(B) Gave him to Susan's mother
(C) Under the bed
(D) Gave him to Joe

Q.10. What did Andrew conclude from the whiteness of the child?
(A) That he was dead.
(B) That he suffered from lack of oxygen. 
(C) That he should be taken to hospital.
(D) That Andrew couldn't save him.

Q.11. What all things did Andrew use in the treatment?
(A) Hot and cold water
(B) Basins and towels
(C) A blanket
(D) All of the above

Q.12. How did Andrew try to save the still born? 
(A) Using a special method of respiration
(B) Calling Dr. Edward
(C) Taking him to a hospital
(D) Giving him blood

Q.13. What did Andrew remember in the middle of ongoing treatment?
(A) About his love for Christine
(B) Morgan family's longing for a child
(C) His time in Samaritan
(D) About his obligation as a doctor

Q.14. Why did the child become slippery in Andrew's Q-17. hand?
(A) Because of atmosphere in the room.
(B) Because Andrew was losing his focus.
(C) Because of constant juggling between waters.
(D) None of the above

Q.15. Why did Andrew get oblivious to all the work he had done in Blaenelly?
(A) Because he got all hopeless. 
(B) Because he did something extraordinary that night. 
(C) Because he was leaving Blaenelly.
(D) Because he got tired.

Q 16. Why did Andrew get oblivious to all the work he had done in Blaenelly? 
(A) Because he got all hopeless.
(B) Because he did something extraordinary that night. 
(C) Because he was leaving Blaenelly.
(D) Because he got tired.

Q.17. Why is the lesson named "Birth"?
(A) Because the doctor is specialist in childbirths.
(B) Because a lot of childbirths take place. 
(C) Because it is about birth of a child.
(D) Because it talks about philosophy of life.

Q.18. What can you say about Dr. Andrew after reading "Birth"?
(A) He did not put all his efforts.
(B) He fulfilled his obligations well as a doctor.
(C) His skills were not enough.
(D) He was arrogant.

Answer key:-
1. (A)
2. (A)
3. (C)
4. (C)
5. (A)
6. (D)
7. (C)
8. (A)
9. (C)
10. (B)
11. (D)
12. (A)
13. (B)
14. (C)
15. (D)
16. (B)
17. (C)
18. (B)

Extract Based MCQs:-

1. Read the extract given below and answer the following questions by choosing the correct option:
As he gazed at the still form a shiver of horror passed over Andrew. After all that, he had promised! His face heated with his own exertions, chilled suddenly. He hesitated, torn between his desire to attempt to resuscitate the child and his obligation towards the mother, who was herself in a desperate state. The dilemma was so urgent he did not solve it consciously, Blindly, instinctively, he gave the child to the nurse and turned his attention to Susan Morgan who now lay collapsed, almost pulseless and not yet out of the ether, upon her side.
His haste was desperate, a frantic race against her ebbing strength.

Q1. "After all that he had promised!" What promise was made by Dr Andrew?
(A) To save Mrs. Morgan 
(B) To save Mr Morgan
(C) To save the new born
(D) All of these

Q.2. How did Andrew solve his dilemma?
(A) Blindly
(B) Consciously
(C) Instinctively
(D) both (B) & (C)

Q.3. Based on the above extract, classify the following as Fact (F) or Opinion (O). 
1. The child was dead.
2. Andrew should have tried to save the child first.
3. Andrew decided to save Susan first
4. Andrew quickly gave an injection to Susan.

(A) F-1,2; O-3,4 
(B) F-1,3,4; O-2
(C) F-1,3; O-2,4
(D) F-1,4; O-2,3

Q.4. Which of the following doesn't use 'a frantic race' correctly?
(A) A frantic race against COVID. 
(B) A frantic race against time to complete the curriculum.
(C) A frantic race against time to reach destination within time
(D) A frantic race to eat fruits to become stronger.

Q.5. Which word in the passage mean the same as 'revive someone from the unconsciousness'?
(A) Hesitated
(B) Frantic
(C) Resuscitate
(D) Ebbing

Answer key :-
1. (C)Explanation: To hand over a healthy child to the Morgans, as they had been childless for years.
2. (D)
3. (B)
4. (D)
5. (C)








Tuesday, February 8, 2022

MCQs - Class XI - Woven Words - The World is Too Much With Us by William Wordsworth

Multiple Choice Questions based on the poem: The World is Too Much With Us by William Wordsworth, keeping in mind the latest online test pattern in CBSE Schools due to COVID pandemic. 


  1. The poem ‘The World is Too Much with Us’ is a poem by 

  1. William Wordsworth 

  1. William Butler Yeats 

  1. Samuel Tailor Coleridge 

  1. William Blake 

  1. The poem ‘The World is Too Much With Us’ poem written in 

  1. Iambic dimeter 

  1. Iambic trimeter 

  1. Iambic tetrameter 

  1. Iambic pentameter 

  1. What is the genre of the poem ‘The World is Too Much With Us’? 

  1. Petrarchan Sonnet 

  1. Shakespearean Sonnet 

  1. Spenserian Sonnet 

  1. Miltonic Sonnet 

  1. Which option explains the title ‘The World is Too Much With Us’ more appropriately? 

  1. We are attached to the world a lot and it is a good thing 

  1. The world is too complex to handle 

  1. People are giving time to their family and friends 

  1. People have become so concerned with worldly material things that they have neglected the natural world. 

  1. What is the theme of the poem ‘The World is Too Much With Us’? 

  1. Denouncing materialism 

  1. Impact of the busy life 

  1. Loss of Nature and the natural world 

  1. All the above 

  1. What does the poet criticise in this poem? 

  1. The world of the first industrial revolution 

  1. People’s attitude towards materialism 

  1. People’s attitude towards nature 

  1. All of the above 

  1. How many Greek Gods are described in this poem? 

  1. Two  

  1. Three 

  1. Four 

  1. None 

  1. What is the quality of sea God Proteus? 

  1. He is indestructible and undefeatable 

  1. He can assume different shapes 

  1. He remains constant 

  1. He represents worldly things 

  1. What is the quality of Triton God? 

  1. He blows his conch in order to calm the waves 

  1. He represents fire and ice 

  1. He is a demigod of the sea 

  1. Both A and C 

  1. “The sea that bares her bosom to the moon” which figure of speech has been used in this line? 

  1. Simile 

  1. Metaphor  

  1. Personification 

  1. Synecdoche 

  1. The poet William Wordsworth’s poem mostly deal with 

  1. Humble and Rustic life 

  1. Industrial Revolution 

  1. The violent aspect of Nature 

  1. Day to day experience of the common man 

  1. Find out the figure of speech in the following lines: “the winds that will be howling at all hours”? 

  1. Assonance 

  1. Personification 

  1. Both A and B 

  1. None of the Above 

  1. What is the rhyme scheme of the poem? 

  1. ABBA ABBA CDE CDE 

  1. ABAB ABAB CDC CDC 

  1. ABCD ABCD EFG EFG 

  1. ABCD EFGH IJK IJK 

  1. How many lines are there in the poem? 

  1. 12 

  1. 14 

  1. 16 

  1. 18 

  1. Who wishes to remain as pagan in the poem? 

  1. Tribal Man 

  1. Poet himself 

  1. Common Man 

  1. Nature 

 

ANSWER KEY 

4. D 

7. A 

10. C 

13. A 

5. D 

8. B 

11. A 

14. B 

6. D 

9. D 

12. C 

15. B 

 

 


Sunday, February 6, 2022

MCQs - Class XI - Snapshots - Chapter 5 - Mother's Day - by J.B. Priestly.

Objective type questions:-

Q.1. Who is the writer of the play "Mother's Day"? 
(A) A.J. Cronin
(B) William Wordsworth
(C) Patrick Pringle
(D) J.B. Priestly

Q. 2. What does the play "Mother's Day" talk about?
(A) Status of the mother in the family
(B) Status of the father in the family
(C) Status of the children in the famil
(D) Status of the family in the society

Q.3. How does the author describe Mrs. Fitzgerald?
(A) Worried looking
(B) Sinister looking
(C) With deep voice
(D) Both (B) and (C)

Q.4. Where did Mrs. Fitzgerald learn to tell the future?
(A) The West
(B) The East
(C) The Middle-East
(D) Not mentioned in the play

Q.5. How does Mrs. Pearson describe her family members?
(A) Thoughtless and selfish
(B) Pleasant and helpful
(C) Hardworking
(D) Mindful

Q.6. In what endeavour does Mrs. Fitzgerald help Mrs. Pearson?
(A) To see future
(B) To make her family treat her well
(C) To run errands
(D) None of the above

Q.7. How would you describe Mrs. Pearson?
(A) Dominating
(B) Considerate
(C) Compliant
(D) Both (B) and (C)

Q. 8. How does Mrs. Fitzgerald plan to help Mrs. Pearson?
(A) By talking to Mrs. Pearson's family.
(B) By listening to Mrs. Pearson's rants.
(C) By swapping personalities with Mrs. Pearson
(D) Both (A) and (B)

Q.9. What is the first thing that Doris does as soon as she enters the house?
(A) Asks her mother to give her tea.
(B) Asks her mother to cook something for her. 
(C) Asks her mother about her day.
(D) Asks her mother to iron her yellow silk.

Q.10. What makes Doris astounded as soon as she enters the house?
(A) The sight of her mother smoking.
(B) Because the tea was not ready.
(C) Because her mother was not there.
(D) None of the above

Q.11. What are the 'changes' that Mrs. Pearson referred to Cyril?
(A) Change in the way she is treated by the family. 
(B) Changes in her daily routine.
(C) Changes related to her work.
(D) None of the above

 Q.12. Why was Doris red eyed?
(A) Because of an infection
(B) Because of a fight 
(C) Because of crying
(D) Because she was getting ready to head out.
 
Q.13. How does the author describe George Pearson?
(A) Pompous
(B) Solemn
(C) Fifty-ish
(D) All of the above

Q.14. "It's that silly old bag from Fitzgerald." Who said this?
(A) Doris
(B) Cyril
(C) George
(D) Mrs. Pearson

Q.15. What does George mean when he says 'we're at sixes and sevens here'?
(A) In a state of confusion and 
(B) In a middle of a conflict disorder
(C) In a middle of taking a decision
(D) In a state of against

Q.16. When do Mrs. Pearson and Mrs. Fitzgerald get back to their original selves?
(A) When Mrs. Pearson's family gets to know about them.
(B) When they both get bored.
(C) When the situation goes out of hand. 
(D) None of the above

Q.17. What message does the author of "Mother's Day" try to convey?
(A) To appreciate wives/mothers for their work
(B) To work hard for your mother 
(C) To spend time with family
(D) To respect everyone

Answer key :-
1. (D)
2. (A)
3. (D)
Explanation: Cunning and threatening.

4. (B)

5. (A)
Explanation: None of them cared for the lady of the house.

6. (B)
7. (D)
Explanation: Adjusting and caring for her family.

8. (C)
9. (D)
10. (A)
Explanation: Surprised to see her mother smoking.

11. (A)
12. (C)
Explanation: She was scolded by her mother, so, she was crying.

13. (D)
Explanation: Middle-aged fat man.

14. (B)
15. (A)

16. (C)
Explanation: When the situation goes out of hand because Mrs. Fitzgerald became quite harsh with Mrs. Pearson's family.

17. (A)
Explanation: To appreciate wives/mother's for their work.

Extract Based MCQs:-
I. Read the extract given below and answer the following questions by choosing the correct option:
Mrs. PEARSON: Yes, thank you, Mrs. Fitzgerald. I'm much obliged, I'm sure. It's wonderful having a real fortune-teller living next door. Did you learn that out East, too? Mrs. FITZGERALD: I did. Twelve years I had of it, with my old man rising to be Lieutenant Quartermaster. He learnt a lot and I learnt a lot more. But will you make up your mind now, Mrs. Pearson dear? Put your foot down, once an for all, an' be the mistress of your own house an' the boss of your own family.

Q.1. What does Mrs. Pearson find so wonderful?
(A) Having Mrs. Fitzgerald at her house 
(B) Having Mrs. Fitzgerald as her friend 
(C) Having Mrs. Fitzgerald as her neighbour
(D) All of the above


Q.2. Mrs. Fitzgerald learnt the art of___in the East.

(A) Ouija board 
(B) Fortune telling 
(C) horoscope reading Ans. Option (B) is correct.
(D) Both (B) & (C)
 
Q.3. To whom does 'old man' refer to in the given extract?
(A) Any person of old age 
(B) Husband of Mrs. Fitzgerald 
(C) Husband of Mrs. Pearson
(D) None of the above

Q.4. Which of the following has incorrect use of once and for all'?
(A) I have settled the dispute once and for all. 
(B) I have sold my house once and for all. 
(C) I have decided to study medicine once and for all.
(D) I have cooked my food once and for all.

Q.5. Which of the following is not advised by Mrs. Fitzgerald to Mrs. Pearson?

1. make up your mind 
2. put your foot down
3. put your hands up
4. be mistress of your house 
5. be the boss of your house.
6. hold your head high
(A) 1,3
(B) 2,4
(C) 4,6
(D) 3,6

Answer key:-
1. (C)
Explanation: Having Mrs. Fitzgerald, the fortune teller as her neighbour.

2. (B)
Explanation: she was a fortune teller.

3. (B) 

4. (D)
Explanation: I have cooked my food once and for all.

5. (D)

II. Read the extract given below and answer the questions that follow. Mrs PEARSON (complacently] Of course, it's happened. Very neat. Didn't know I had it in

me Mrs. FITZGERALD: (alarmed] But whatever shall I do, Mrs. Fitzgerald? Gearge and the children can't ser m

like this.

Mrs. PEARSON [grmly] They aren't going to-that's the point. They have me to deal with only Mrs. FITZGERALD: (still alarmed) But what if we can't change back? Ird be terrible

they want

know it.

Mrs. PEARSON: Here-steady, Mrs. Pearson-if you had to live my life it wouldn't be so bad You'd have moer fun as me than you've had as you.



Q. 1. "Mrs. FITZGERALD: [alarmed] But whatever shall I do, Mrs. Fitzgerald? George and the children can't see me like this"
Why is Mrs. Fitzgerald addressing herself? 
(A) She is actually Mrs. Pearson after switching personality with Mrs. Fitzgerald.
(B) She has become insane.
(C) She didn't know what she was blabbering
(D) She had split personality disorder.

 Q.2. About which quality of herself, did Mrs. Pearson boast about?
(A) She was actually Mrs Fitzgerald who was a wonderful cook.
(B) She was actually Mrs. Fitzgerald who was master at switching personalities 
(C) She was actually Mrs. Fitzgerald who was a great home maker.
(D) She was actually Mrs. Fitzgerald who was a strict disciplinarian.

Q. 3. Who was George?
(A) Mrs. Fitzgerald's husband 
(B) Mr. Pearson's husband
(C) Mrs Pearson's business partner
(D) Mrs Fitzgerald's business partner

Q.4. Why would Mrs. Pearson have more fun as Mrs. Fitzgerald than she'd have as herself? (A) Mrs. Fitzgerald didn't have her family.
(B) Mrs. Fitzgerald was a party animal.
(C) Mrs. Fitzgerald was a cunning and shrewd lady.
(D) Mrs. Fitzgerald knew how to live life at her own terms.

Q.5. 'Complacently' mean: 
(A) considerately
(B) cunningly
(C) showing smug or uncritical satisfaction with oneself or one's achievements
(D) alarmingly

Answer key:-
1. (A)
2. (B)
3. (B)
4. (D)
5. (C)

III. Read the extract given below and answer the questions that follow:

CYRIL: Now you shouldn't have told him that, Mum. That's not fair. You've hurt his feelings. Mine, too. MRS, PEARSON: Sometimes it does people good to have their feelings hurt. The truth oughtn't to hurt anybody for long. If your father didn't go to the club so often, perhaps they'd stop laughing at him. 
Q.1. "You've hurt his feelings." Whose feelings are hurt?
(A) Doris
(B) George
(C) Mrs. Fitzgerald's husband
(D) None of these

Q.2 What was told to him to hurt his feelings? (A) That he was an old bag
(B) That he was dependent on his wife for everything.
(C) That his friends call him names at the club.
(D) All of these.

Q.3. In the above dialogue, Mrs. Pearson sounds
(A) wise
(B) humorous
(C) gloomy
(D) sincere

Q.4. What possible solution did the lady give for the problem of George?
(A) He should fight with his friends.
(B) He should call up his friends and ask for clarification.
(C) Visit club less often.
(D) Work out to improve his personality.

Q.5. What did Mrs. Fitzgerald intend to gain by insulting Mr. Pearson and his children? 
(A) Respect for herself
(B) Respect for Mrs Pearson
(C) To make them behave properly and sensibly
(D) Both (8) & (C)

Answer key:-
1. (B)
2. (C)
Explanation: Mrs. Fitzgerald told George, "You're one of their standing jokes. Famous. They call you Pompy Ompy Pearson because they think you're so slow and pompous"

3. (A)
Explanation: She then imparts some words of wisdom by telling him that truth only hurts for a short while and it is fine to get one's feelings times
4. (C)
Explanation: "If your father didn't go to the club so often, perhaps they'd stop laughing at him."
5. (D)
Explanation: She wanted to teach them a lesson to be respectful of wife and mother.

Short Answer Type Questions:-

Q.1. What picture of Mrs. Pearson emerges in the opening of the play 'Mother's Day'? 
Ans. Mrs. Pearson is in her forties. She is a pleasant looking woman. She is a typical housewife. She takes delight in serving her family, though they take no notice of her. Even if they are thoughtless and selfish, she is very fond of them. She bears with them patiently as she does not want any unpleasantness in the house. 

Q.2. What fortune does Mrs. Fitzgerald predict for Mrs. Pearson?
Ans. Mrs. Fitzgerald is quite equivocal in her predictions. She says it could be a good fortune or a bad one. All depends on Mrs. Pearson's herself now. She asks her to decide firmly. Her fortune depends on it. 

Q.3. What difficulties does Mrs. Pearson face while dealing with the various members of her family?
Ans. Mrs. Pearson loves her husband and children too much. She does not find enough courage to discuss the problem with them. She only keeps dropping hints. She hates any unpleasantness. She does not know where to start from. She doesn't know how to begin discussion with the other members of the family. 

Q. 4. What is Mrs. Pearson's problem? What advice does Mrs. Fitzgerald give her?
Ans. Mrs. Pearson's problem is that her family takes no notice of her, though she is extremely fond of them. She runs after them all the time, takes their orders as if she was the servant in the house. She stays at home every night while they go out enjoying themselves. Mrs. Fitzgerald advises her that she should assert herself as the mistress of the house if she wants them to treat her properly.

Q. 5. Then let me do it,' suggests Mrs. Fitzgerald. How does Mrs. Pearson react to it? Ans. Mrs. Fitzgerald offers to deal with the family of Mrs. Pearson and teach them to treat her properly. Mrs. Pearson feels flustered. She thanks her saying that it wouldn't do at all. They would resent being ill-treated by somebody else and wouldn't listen.

Q. 6. How does Mrs. Fitzgerald perform the trick of changing her personality with that of Mrs. Pearson? 
Ans. Mrs. Fitzgerald holds the hands of Mrs. Pearson and asks her to keep quiet and not to think about anything. Then she recites a spell. After the spell has been spoken, the two women got relax, as if the life had been drained out of them. Then both come to life. Now, Mrs. Pearson has the personality of Mrs. Fitzgerald and Mrs. Fitzgerald has of Mrs. Pearson.

Q.7. What changes come over Mrs. Pearson and Mrs. Fitzgerald when they change personalities? 
Ans. After Mrs. Fitzgerald tells her spell, she and Mrs. Pearson mutually changed personalities. Now, Mrs. Fitzgerald is nervous and confused. On the other hand, Mrs. Pearson dominating, aggressive and bossy.

Q.8 How does mother make fun of Charlie Spence?
Ans. Charlie Spence is Doris boyfriend. She intends to go out with him that evening. But mother makes fun of Charlie Spence. She says that Charlie has buckteeth and he is half-witted. She wonders why Doris could not find
anyone better than Charlie Spence

Q.9. Mention three things in the behaviour of mother that astonish Doris. 
Ans. First, mother, has not got tea ready for her as usual. Secondly, mother's smoking. Thirdly, she is not in mood to iron her silk that she intends to wear that evening.

0.10. What, according to Doris, could be the reason for mother's strange behaviour ? Does Cyril agree with her?
Ans. According to Doris, mother has hit her head or something that could have been the cause of her strange behaviour. Cyril agrees that his mother's behaviour was rather odd, but Dons' idea seems too far-fetched to him.

Q.11. Why does Doris ask mother whether she had fallen or hit herself with something? How does mother react to it?
Ans. Doris asks mother whether she had fallen or hit herself with something because she is under the impression that mother had gone barmy because of some violent shock Mother becomes aggressive to hear this and asks her to behave properly and stop asking such silly questions. 

Q.12 Why is Cyril Pearson astonished at mother's behaviour? 
Ans. First, mother has not got tea ready for him, as usual Secondly, she has not got his things ready though she had promised in the morning to look through them in case there was any mending Obviously, he is astonished at strange behaviour of the mother. Then, mother asks him whether there is any stout left in the house. He wonders why his mother needs stout.

Q. 13. That's a nice way to talk what would happen if we all talked like that?" says Cyril. In what context does he say so? What argument does he get in return? 
Ans. When, Mrs. Pearson tells her son Cyril that she has decided now that she doesn't like mending, Cyril objects to her words. Mrs. Pearson gives him a taste of his own medicine by saying that all of them talk like that. If there's something at home, they don't like to do they don't do it. If it is something at their work, they get the union to bar it. She has now joined the movement.

Q. 14. 'Well, that ought to be a nice change for you' says Mrs. Pearson. What change does she refer and how does George react react to it?
Ans. George finds his wife Annie (Mrs. Pearson) drinking stout at the wrong time of the day. Moreover, he has never seen her doing it before. Naturally, he is confused and surprised. When he remarks that he doesn't like her drinking and it doesn't look right, Mrs. Pearson remarks about the change in her style.

Q.15. What is odd, according to Mrs. Pearson, in the behaviour of George, when he is annoyed with her for not getting his tea ready?
Ans. George tells Mrs. Pearson that he does not want any tea. When Mrs. Pearson tells him that there is no tea ready for him, he gets annoyed. She wonders why he is annoyed at not getting his tea ready while he does not want it. This seems rather odd to her.

Q.16. How is Doris taught a lesson in behaviour?
Ans. When Mrs. Fitzgerald remarks that Doris is going out with Charlie Spence that night. Doris feels annoyed and retorts that she has got nothing to do with it. Mrs. Pearson rebukes Doris harshly and tells her to answer Mrs. Fitzgerald properly. She adds that she won't have her daughter behaving rudely with anyone.

Q.17. Why does Mrs. Pearson rebuke Doris in the presence of Fitzgerald?
Ans. When Doris enters the room, Mrs. Fitzgerald greets her and asks her whether she is going out with Charle Spence Doris tells her impudently that none of her business. Mrs. Pearson rebukes her and asks her to answer Mrs. Fitzgerald properly.

Q. 18. Why does Mrs. Pearson threaten to slap her husband? 
Ans. George feels angry at being humiliated in the presence of his neighbour He loses his temper and asks his wife if she has gone mad. This is too much for Mrs. Pearson to bear. She jumps up and threatens to slap George if he shouts at her again.

Q.19. Why did George Pearson get astonished when Mrs. Fitzgerald calls him 'George'? How does Mrs. Pearson make fun of him?
Ans. Mrs. Fitzgerald is their neighbour Obviously, George Pearson is astonished when she informally calls him 'George' Mrs Pearson makes fun of him by saying that his name is, after all, George and then asks him mockingly whether he thinks he is Duke of Edinburgh.

Q. 20. How does Mrs. Pearson make fun of her husband? How does he respond to it?
Ans. Mrs. Pearson tells her husband that they laugh at him at the club and call him Pompy-Ompy Pearson because they think he is so slow and pompous. When his son. Cyril, also confirms it, he is shocked and staggers out of the room.

Q. 21. How does Mrs. Pearson teach her children to be responsible adults?
Ans. First, she scolds them for their guffawing and giggling. Then she has a dig at their lifestyle. They just come in, ask for something, go out again and then return as there's nowhere else to go. When Doris and Cyril boast of doing their work all day, Mrs. Pearson tells them that she has also done her eight hours work She threatens to have two days off at the weekend.

Q. 22. How does the stern treatment reform the spoilt children? 
Ans. The children look apprehensively at Mrs. Pearson. However, they smile back at her as she smiles. Since they are not going out, she suggests having a nice family game rummy. She tells the children to get the supper ready while she has a talk with their father. The spoilt children meekly obey her. 

Q. 23. How does Mrs. Pearson propose to spend the evening? Is her proposal acceptable to the family?
Ans. Mrs. Pearson proposes that they would have a nice family game of rummy. Then children could get the supper ready while she has a talk with their father. Then looking sharply at the family, she asks them if they objection. All speak in one voice that it suits them. Thus, Mrs. Pearson finally succeeds in keeping the family have any home that evening.

Q. 24. "But any of you, forty hour a weekend, who expect to be waited on hand and foot on Saturday and Sunday with no thanks for it, are in for a nasty disappointment. says Mrs. Pearson. How has she planned to spend the
weekend?
Ans. She has decided not to serve them on weekends as she used to earlier. She might do cooking or make a bed or two as a favour only if she is asked very nicely and thanked for it. They'll have to pay attention to her and show care and concern. Perhaps, she might go off for the weekend. It will provide her a change. She is bored of remaining at home at the time.

Q.25. What last warning did Mrs. Fitzgerald give to Mrs. Pearson? 
Ans. Mrs. Fitzgerald advises Mrs. Pearson not to go soft on them again. She must not start giving explanations for her bad behaviour or asking for apologies. She should keep firm. Now and then, she should give them a look or a tone of voice to suggest that she might be tough with them if she wanted to be.

Q.26. What advice did Mrs. Fitzgerald give to Mrs. Pearson, to her husband, son and daughter? 
Ans. Mrs. Fitzgerald advised Mrs. Pearson to be firm with her family and not to give in to their demands. She also taught the family how to treat their wives and mothers. 

Q.27. Compare and contrast Mrs. Pearson and Mrs. Fitzgerald on the basis of the play 'Mother's Day.
Ans. The two ladies are sharply contrasted. Mrs. Pearson is pleasant but worried looking woman in her forties. She speaks in a light, flurried sort of tone with a touch of suburban cockney. Mrs. Fitzgerald is older, heavier and has a strong and sinister personality. She smokes. She has a deep voice and Irish tone.

Long Answer Type Questions:-

Q.1. What is the problem confronted by Mrs. Pearson? Who helps her solve this problem and how?
Ans. Mrs. Pearson's problem is that she is neglected by her husband and children. She is very fond of her family. She runs after them all the time, takes their orders as if she was the servant in the house and stays at home every night while they go out enjoying themselves. She takes no holiday. They have come to believe that she is there simply to look after them and wait for them. So they take no notice of her Her neighbour, Mrs. Fitzgerald, helps her solve this problem. She advises Mrs. Pearson to assert her rights as the mistress of the house if she wants them to treat her properly. Mrs. Pearson says that she does keep dropping a hint now and then, but n't be harsh with them as she does not want any unpleasantness in the house. Mrs. Fitzgerald asks her to let her do it. Mrs. Pearson wonders how it is possible. Mrs. Fitzgerald tells her that they would change their personalities with each other. She had learnt this trick when she was in East. Mrs. Pearson hesitates, but she finally agrees. The two women change their personalities. Now, Mrs. Pearson with Mrs. Fitzgerald's personality, puts the members of her family in their proper places. They begin to give her due regard and consideration.

Q.2. How does Mrs. Pearson make her daughter Doris miserable?
Ans. Doris Pearson enters the room violently and orders her mother to iron her yellow silk, as she has to wear it that i night. She is astonished to find her mother smoking. She finds mother's behaviour rather unusual. When she asks about tea, mother says casually that she has not got her tea ready. She is surprised to hear that mother is thinking of going out and get a meal at the Clarendon. Mother always irons her clothes ungrudgingly, but now she seems to be in no mood to iron her yellow silk for her Formerly, mother never objected to her going out with Charlie Spence. Now, when Doris tells her that she is going out with Charlie Spence, mother severely asks her whether she should not find anybody better than that buck teeth and half-witted Charlie Spence. This is too much for Doris. She runs out of the room with tears in her eyes.

Q.3. What is the reaction of Doris and Cyril to the unusual behaviour of their mother? 
Ans. Both Doris and Cyril are astonished at the unusual behaviour of their mother. She has always been very kind and affectionate, meek and submissive. But now she is very cold and indifferent and seems to be in a defiant mood. She has not bothered to get tea ready for them and asks them to help themselves. When Doris asks her to iron her yellow silk, mother refuses to oblige. She has not cared to put Cyril's things out though she had promised that morning to look through them in case their was any mending. They are astonished to hear that mother, who has been running after them all the time taking their orders, now proposes to work forty hours a week and have two days off from household chores. They stand against to see her going to the kitchen to fetch stout for herself. As far as they know her she has never tasted stout. They thought that they had done something wrong and mother was offended with them. But now they realise there is something wrong with the mother. Doris thinks mother might have hit her head and got sotne violent shock, but her idea seems too far-fetched to Cyril. Nevertheless, they laugh to think how she would behave when Dad comes home.

Q.4. The play 'Mother's Day' is a humorous and satirical depiction of the status of the woman in a family. Bring out briefly the elements of humour and satire.
Ans. The play 'Mother's Day' is a humorous and satirical depiction of the status of the woman in a family, shown in its serious theme treated in a light-hearted manner. The humour in the play springs from an unusual situation where the personalities of two ladies exchange bodies. Their subsequent behaviour, which is in total contrast to their previous one, is a very powerful source of laughter. The importance of the character about the personality they are facing also creates humour. The following dialogues also provide a lot of fun. "Mrs. Pearson if you had to live my life it wouldn't be so bad. You'd have more fun as me than you've had as you "It's that silly old bag from next door, Mrs. Fitzgerald "Tickling her off now, are you, Annie?" They call you Pompy-Ompy Pearson because they think you're so slow and pompous.
The actions, gestures and reactions of the characters also provide humour. The housewife being given orders, treated like dirt and forced to stay home every night, while other members go out to amuse themselves sharply contrasts with the position at the end of the play where she is the mistress of the house. The play also satirises the eight hour work culture and threats to go on strike. Even the housewife adopts this weapon.

Q.5. Throw light on Mrs. Fitzgerald's efforts to reform Mrs. Pearson's
Ans. Mrs. Pearson does not have the courage to stand up for her rights. Therefore, Mrs. Fitzgerald suggests a novel approach-exchange of personalities. Now, as Mrs. Pearson, with the personality of Mrs. Fitzgerald, she puts the plan of formation in action. She smokes, drinks, and plays cards. All this is unusual for the family. She further shocks them by being tough with them in words and action. She asks them to look after themselves. She clearly tells them that she has already worked for more than eight hours that day. She tells them plainly how they behave at home and work place. She is equally blunt with Mr. George Pearson, who goes away every evening to the club, leaving his wife alone at home. She reveals to him how the people at club make a fun of him. In short, she makes them realize their responsibility towards the mother. In the end, she performs the exchange of personalities once again. Thus. Mes Fitzerald makes the family members of Mrs. Pearson learn that she deserves respect and responsible behaviour from them.

Q. 6. How does Mrs. Pearson behave towards her husband after she changes her personality with that of Mrs. Fitzgerald?
Ans. When George enters the room, he is astonished to see her sipping stout as he has never seen her doing it before He informs her that he doesn't want any tea as he would have supper at the club. His wife tells him impudently that there is no tea ready. He is annoyed to know that his wife didn't get tea ready for him. She laughs at his childishness and remarks that if he behaved like that the club would laugh at him even more than they do now He is surprised to hear that they laugh at him at the club. Mrs. Pearson continues that he is one of their standing jokes and they call him Pompy-Ompy Pearson because they think he is so slow and pompous. She wonders why he wants to spend so much time at a place where they are always laughing at him behind his back and calling him names. George is horrified at the revelations. Later, Mrs. Fitzgerald visits their house. Since, she addresses him informally as George George is annoyed. Making fun of him, Mrs. Pearson remarks it makes a little difference whether he is addressed as George Pearson or George. Then she asks him whether he thinks he is Duke of Edingburg. George stands against at this disparaging behaviour of his wife.

Q. 7. Write a note on the role of Mrs. Fitzgerald in the play. 
Ans. Mrs. Fitzgerald plays a very important role in the play. She is introduced as a fortune teller and the next-door neighbour of the Pearsons. It is through the initial conversation between her and Mrs. Pearson that we come to know the problems that Mrs. Pearson faces: Mrs Fitzgerald analyses the situation quite objectively and becomes the playwright's mouthpiece. She also suggests the ways and methods of tackling the situation. Strice, Mrs. Pearson does not have the guts to stand for right Mrs. Fitzgerald suggests a novel approach-exchange personalities. Now, as Mrs Pearson, with the personality of Mrs. Fitzgerald, she puts the plan of formation action. She smoke drinks and plays cards. All this is unusual for the family. She further shocks them by being tough with them in words and action. She asks them to look after themselves. She clearly tells them that she has already worked for more than eight hours that day. She tells them plainly how they behave at home and work place. She is equally blunt with Mr. George Pearson, who goes away every evening to club, leaving his wife alone at home. She reveals to him how the people at club make a fun of him. In short, she makes them realize their responsibility towards the mother. In the end, she performs the exchange of personalities once again. Thus, she is the main spring of initial action, climax.

Q.8. Sketch the character of Mrs. Pearson.
Ans. The character of Mrs. Pearson can be best studied in three parts: (a) before she changes her personality with that of Mrs. Fitzgerald; (b) after she changes her personality with Mrs. Fitzgerald; and (c) after she becomes her Before Mrs. Pearson changes her personality with that of Mrs. Fitzgerald she is an ideal housewife. She spends proper personality, all her time in looking after her family, waiting on them like a servant and meeting all their needs. She suffers in silence and does not express her resentment for fear of creating any unpleasantness in the house. After changing her personality with Mrs. Fitzgerald, she is bold and defiant. She refuses to obey their orders. She speaks to them impudently and shows them their proper place in the family. After Mrs. Pearson becomes her proper personality, we note a marked change in her behaviour. She is no longer meek, submissive and docile. She knows how to suggest to them with a look or a tone of voice that she is mistress of the house and she could be tough with them if she wanted to be.

Q.9. What do you think is the theme of the play? How has it been worked out? 
Or
What is the main idea of the play Mother's Day? Has it been brought out effectively by the writer? Discuss.
Ans. The theme of the play is the status of women in their own household. The housewife serves the members of her family with complete devotion, sincerity and love. However, she is never given the regard, attention or thanks due to her Her leniency and eagerness to please everyune reduces her to the rank of unpaid domestic servant in her own house. Instead of being politely requested for a favour, she is ordered to do it She gets no thanks in return.
The theme is worked out by the portrayal of the Pearson family. Mrs. Pearson is the harassed mother. Her daughter Doris, son Cyril and husband George take her services for granted and have become thoughtless and selfish. The interchange of the personalities and the harsh treatment meted out to them by the personality of Mrs. Fitzgerald (in body of Mrs Pearson) reforms them and they obey the mother willingly.

Q.10. Write a note on the title of the play Mother's Day
Ans. The title of the play is quite appropriate. It sums up theme of the play which suggests that the actions of the play revolves around a mother. The playwright, confronts us at the outset with the problems the mother faces from her grown-up children and their father. The novel technique employed to tackle the spoilt children and the grown up man is quite amusing and thought provoking. The bold and dominating mother is thought, acts tough with the children and makes them realize the need of proper attention towards their mother. They are made to learn lessons in courtesy and polite behaviour not only towards the mother but towards the visiting neighbour also. The mother certainly has her day as the children learn to treat her properly. The supper being prepared by the children, their stay at home and the family game of rummy, is a rare gift that the mother receives on the important day. 

Q.11. What social message does the play Mother's Day convey? How relevant is it in the present day context? 
Ans. The play Mother's Day raises a serious issue. The treatment is humorous Mother plays a lot of roles and performs all the duties with patience. Her excessive love and concern should be respected by the members of family. She should not be taken for granted as she is the backbone of the family. Women face physical forture and mental anguish in today's society, This play conveys the message to resolve the issues to harmonise the society.